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Texas Tech Red Raiders
AmericanFootball current event.svg 2019 Texas Tech Red Raiders
Texas Tech Red Raiders NCAA-Big 12-Texas Tech Red Raiders Black Helmet
First season 1925
Athletic director Kirby Hocutt
Head coach Matt Wells
1st year, 0–0–0 (.000)
Home stadium Jones AT&T Stadium
Stadium capacity 60,454[1]
Stadium surface FieldTurf
Location Lubbock, Texas
Conference Big 12
Past conferences Border Conference
Southwest Conference
All-time history
Texas Tech Red Raiders Historical Teams
1925 1926 1927 1928 1929
1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949
1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
All-time record 562–443–32 (.567)
Postseason bowl record 14–23–1 (.382)
Conference titles 11
Division titles 1
Rivalries Baylor (rivalry)
Oklahoma State (rivalry)
TCU (rivalry)
Texas (rivalry)
Texas A&M (rivalry)
Heisman winners 0 (8 finalists)
Consensus All-Americans 11[2]
Current uniform
NCAA-Big 12-Texas Tech Red Raiders Uniform
Colors Black and Scarlet

             


Fight song Fight, Raiders, Fight
Mascot The Masked Rider /
Raider Red
Marching band Goin' Band from Raiderland
Website Texas Tech Red Raiders
The Texas Tech Red Raiders sports program is a member of the NCAA FBS Big 12 Conference, with the football team playing their home games at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas. The program began in 1925 and has an overall winning record, including a total of eleven conference titles and one division title. On November 30, 2018, Matt Wells was hired as the team's 16th head football coach after former Red Raiders quarterback Kliff Kingsbury was terminated upon conclusion of the 2018 season.[3] Home games are played at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.[4]

HistoryEdit

Texas Tech (then known as Texas Technological College) fielded its first intercollegiate football team during the 1925 season. The team was known as the "Matadors" from 1925 to 1936, a name suggested by the wife of E. Y. Freeland, the first football coach, to reflect the influence of the Spanish Renaissance architecture on campus. In 1932, Texas Tech joined the Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association, also known as the Border Conference. The school's short-lived Matadors moniker was replaced officially in 1937 with "Red Raiders", a nickname bestowed upon them by a sportswriter impressed by their bright Scarlet uniforms that remains to this day. That same year, the team won its first conference championship and was invited to the Sun Bowl. The game was played on January 1, 1938, and resulted in a 7–6 loss to the West Virginia Mountaineers. Texas Tech suffered four more bowl losses before their first postseason win in the 1952 Sun Bowl.[5] Before withdrawing from the Border Conference in 1956, the Red Raiders won eight conference championships and one co-championship, the most held by a Border Conference member.

In 1956, Texas Tech was admitted to the Southwest Conference (SWC) but was ineligible for any title during a four-year probationary period. It gained full SWC membership and began official conference play in 1960. The Red Raiders won conference co-championships in 1976 and 1994. The team remained in the SWC until the conference dissolved in 1996.[6] The university was invited and became a charter member in the South Division of the Big 12 Conference. Texas Tech was the only member in the history of the Big 12 to boast a winning record every year since the conference's formation, suffering their first losing season in 2011.[6][A 1] In 2008, the Red Raiders were one of three football teams involved in the first three way conference division tie.

StadiumEdit

The Red Raiders play their home games on campus at Jones AT&T Stadium. The stadium opened in 1947 as Clifford B. and Audrey Jones Stadium. In 2000, Jones Stadium was renamed, Jones SBC Stadium, in recognition of a $30 million donation from SBC Communications. Reflecting SBC Communications' rebranding as AT&T, Inc., the stadium's name was renamed in 2005 as Jones AT&T Stadium.[18] Then known as the Matadors, Texas Tech's first home field was a makeshift stadium at the South Plains Fairgrounds in Lubbock, for the 1925 season and first game of the 1926 season. In 1926, Tech Stadium, a wooden horseshoe shaped 12,000 seat stadium, was built on campus.[19][20] Twenty-years later, Jones Stadium as was completed for the 1947 season. Two years prior to the stadium's opening, Clifford B. Jones, former Texas Tech University president, established a $100,000 trust toward construction for a new football stadium. The Texas Tech Board of Directors voted to name the new facility in honor of the former president and his wife's contribution.[21]

Since opening with a seating capacity of 18,000, the stadium has been continuously expanded and renovated. In 1960, the addition of a lower bowl doubled the seating capacity to 41,500, an expansion in 1972 added over 10,000 seats, during the 1990s, 2,000 seats were added, and additions in the 2000s brought the current seating capacity to 60,454.[1] In 2003, a seven-story building including 47 suites, a club seat level and new press box replaced the former press box constructed in 1959.[22][23] In 2010, expansion to the east side of the stadium included a five-story addition that includes 1,000 general-admission seats, 542 club seats, 30 suites, a dining club, and pro shop. Also, ticket and athletic offices are expected to relocate to the East Side Building.[24]

When Jones AT&T Stadium opened in 1947, the playing surface was originally natural grass. However, at the beginning of the 1972 season, the stadium's natural grass was replaced with AstroTurf. Jones AT&T Stadium has had a FieldTurf playing surface since 2006.[1] Jones AT&T Stadium set an attendance record of 60,454 spectators September 18, 2010, when the Red Raiders hosted the Texas Longhorns. The game was the 60th between the in-state rivals. The previous record, with 57,733 in attendance, was set against the Texas A&M Aggies.[1]

UniformsEdit

Texas Tech's football team was originally known as the "Matadors" from 1925 to 1936, a name suggested by the wife of E. Y. Freeland, the first football coach, to reflect the Spanish Renaissance architecture on campus.[25] The students followed the suggestion, and later chose scarlet and black as the school colors inspired by a matador's traditional red cape and black outfit.[26] In 1934, head coach Pete Cawthon ordered scarlet satin uniforms for the football team. He said that if the team did not attract attention by their playing, they would at least be noticed because of the flashy uniforms.[27] The football team, wearing its new outfit, defeated heavily-favored Loyola Marymount in Los Angeles on October 26, 1934.[28] A Los Angeles sports writer called the Matadors a "red raiding team", coining the moniker Texas Tech's athletics teams use today.[27]

Texas Tech's uniform consists of any combination of scarlet, black, and white. Since 2006, Under Armour has been the team's outfitter.[29]

The 2010 team was the first to wear white helmets since 1974. The white helmets were similar in design to the ones worn during the Jim Carlen era from 1970–1974 featuring a one inch scarlet stripe in the middle bordered by two half inch black stripes. The helmets used in 2010 feature a black face mask instead of scarlet and the current version of the Double T.[30] The helmets were worn for away games against the New Mexico Lobos, Iowa State Cyclones, and Oklahoma Sooners.[31][32]

Image/Logos galleryEdit

RivalriesEdit

Texas Tech first played Texas during the 1928 season and have played annually since 1960 when Texas Tech began participating in the Southwest Conference.[33] Since the 1996 season, the Chancellor's Spurs, a traveling trophy, has been exchanged between the two university system chancellors, in honor of the two universities' rivalry.[34] The 2008 game was one of three games that led to a three-way tie controversy in the Big 12 Conference South Division, the first three-way tie in a collegiate conference division.[A 2] The Texas Longhorns lead the all-time series record with 45 wins of the 60 games played and has won 11 of 15 games since the Chancellor's Spurs were first exchanged.[45]

The Texas Tech Red Raiders have played more games against the Texas A&M Aggies and Baylor Bears, than any other opponents.[46] Texas Tech first played the Aggies in 1927 and the teams have played annually since 1957. The two universities' football rivalry has experienced multiple altercations off the playing field between coaches, players and fans.[47] The Texas A&M Aggies lead the all-time series with thirty-six wins of the sixty-nine games played. Since both teams joined the Big 12 Conference in 1996, Texas Tech has won 10, while Texas A&M has won 6, of the these last 16 meetings. Texas A&M currently has a three game winning streak against Texas Tech following their 2011 victory against Texas Tech in Lubbock.[48]

A prior to Texas Tech joining the SWC, a traveling trophy was exchanged between the TCU Horned Frogs and Red Raiders. The trophy was of a miniature saddle and the game between the teams was dubbed "The West Texas Championship."[49]

SeasonsEdit

Notable AlumniEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 2010 Football Media Supplement (PDF). Texas Tech University. Retrieved on 2010-08-06.
  2. NCAA (2009). NCAA Football Award Winners.
  3. Johnson, Richard (November 29, 2018). Official: Matt Wells hired by Texas Tech. SB Nation. Retrieved on December 1, 2018.
  4. Texas Tech Football History Database. Retrieved on 2006-12-31.
  5. Texas Tech Bowl History. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-09-19.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Texas Tech Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-09-19.
  7. Baylor Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  8. Colorado Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  9. Iowa State Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  10. Kansas Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  11. Kansas State Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  12. Missouri Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  13. Nebraska Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  14. Oklahoma Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  15. Oklahoma State Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  16. Texas Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  17. Texas A&M Yearly Totals. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2009-10-12.
  18. Jones AT&T Stadium. Delivered.. AT&T (2006-04-06). Retrieved on 2010-12-08.
  19. Hooks, Michael Q. (May/June 1983). From the Fair Grounds to Jones Stadium (PDF). Texas Techsan. Texas Tech Alumni Association. Retrieved on 2010-12-08.
  20. Rushing, Jane Gilmore; Kline A. Nall (1975). Evolution of a University: Texas Tech's first fifty years. Austin, Texas: Madrona Press. p. 127. Template:Citation/identifier. 
  21. Andrews, Ruth Horn (1956). The First Thirty Years: a History of Texas Technological College. Lubbock, Texas: Texas Tech University Press. p. 68. 
  22. Stadium Club view fan-tastic. Lubbock Avalanche-Journal (2003-07-05). Retrieved on 2010-12-08.
  23. Butler, Kristina Woods (2008-11-06). Cultivating the Home Field Advantage, A Memoir. Texas Tech Today. Texas Tech University. Retrieved on 2010-12-10.
  24. Jansa, Evan (2010-07-19). Renovations to Jones AT&T Stadium set for completion in time for season opener. The Daily Toreador. UWIRE. Retrieved on 2010-12-10.
  25. Andrews, Ruth Horn (1956). The First Thirty Years: a History of Texas Technological College. Lubbock, Texas: Texas Tech University Press. p. 292. 
  26. Clark, Kyle, Siegrist, Nikki. "Making Matadors: Spanish style architecture inspires Tech's first mascot", The Daily Toreador, 2003-03-13. Retrieved on 2008-10-15. 
  27. 27.0 27.1 Andrews, Ruth Horn (1956). The First Thirty Years: a History of Texas Technological College. Lubbock, Texas: The Texas Tech Press. p. 302. 
  28. Texas Tech Yearly Results. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2008-10-15.
  29. Under Armour, Inc. – Under Armour速 Partners with Texas Tech University to be the Official Outfitter of the University's Football Program. Investor.underarmour.com (2006-03-27). Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  30. Texas Tech Football. Masked Raider. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  31. Don Williams (2010-09-15). Red Raiders' use of white helmets elicits range of opinions | Lubbock Online | Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Lubbock Online. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  32. Linehan: Texas Tech vs. Iowa State Notes | Red Raiders[dead link]
  33. Texas Tech Historical Data. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  34. Marlena Hartz (2008-12-14). Texas Tech chancellor reclaims spurs from Texas. Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  35. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  36. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  37. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  38. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  39. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  40. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  41. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  42. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  43. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  44. Conference Division Champions. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  45. Texas Tech Game by Game against Opponents. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  46. Texas Tech Opponents. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  47. AggieSports.com. AggieSports.com (2003-09-30). Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  48. Texas Tech Game by Game against Opponents. CFB Datawarehouse. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.
  49. Pettit: TCU's return re-stirs memories of days left behind | Lubbock Online | Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Lubbock Online. Retrieved on 2011-12-04.

External LinksEdit


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