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Super Bowl LV
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Date February 7, 2021
Stadium Raymond James Stadium
City Tampa, Florida
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Network CBS
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 < LIV Super Bowl LVI > 


Super Bowl LV, the 55th Super Bowl and the 51st modern-era National Football League (NFL) championship game, will decide the league champion for the 2020 NFL season. The game is scheduled to be played on February 7, 2021 in Tampa, Florida (with the exact date pending potential changes to the NFL calendar). This will be the fifth Super Bowl hosted by the Tampa area, with the last one being Super Bowl XLIII in 2009, and the third one held at Raymond James Stadium. The game will be televised nationally by CBS.

Host-selection processEdit

On May 19, 2015, the league announced the five finalists that will compete to host Super Bowl LIII in 2019 and Super Bowl LIV in 2020. NFL owners voted on these cities in May 2016, with the first round of voting determining who will host Super Bowl LIII, the second round deciding the site for Super Bowl LIV; in a development not known in advance, a third round of voting was added to select a Super Bowl LV hosting site during the meetings.[1] At the NFL owner meetings on May 24, 2016, Atlanta and Miami were awarded Super Bowls LIII and LIV respectively, removing them from the running. Los Angeles was not eligible for Super Bowl LIII, as its stadium would not yet be finished; it was eligible for LIV and LV, opting to bid only on the latter. The two candidates were as follows: * Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Florida: Tampa has hosted four Super Bowls, with the last being Super Bowl XLIII in 2009.* Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park, Inglewood, California: Los Angeles has hosted the Super Bowl seven times, most recently in 1993 with Super Bowl XXVII; that game, along with the four prior Super Bowls in the area, were held at the Rose Bowl while first two Super Bowls in Los Angeles area were held at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Los Angeles was originally chosen as the host site in a vote on May 24, 2016.[2][3][4] However, due to construction delays, authorities announced that the Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park would not be completed until the start of the 2020 NFL season.[5] As a result, on May 23, 2017, NFL owners voted to move Super Bowl LV to Tampa. The City of Inglewood will instead be hosting Super Bowl LVI in 2022.[6] 

References Edit

External Links Edit

  • Super Bowl LV article at Wikipedia W
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