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Miami RedHawks football
AmericanFootball current event.svg 2019 Miami (OH) RedHawks
NCAA-MAC-Miami Redhawks mascot & script logo NCAA-MAC-2019 Miami Redhawks main logo - White Schutt hlmet
First season 1888
Athletic director David Sayler
Head coach Chuck Martin
5th year, 22–39 (.361)
Home stadium Yager Stadium
Stadium capacity 24,286
Stadium surface FieldTurf
Location Oxford, Ohio, U.S.
Conference Mid-American (MAC)
Division East
All-time history
Template:Miami RedHawks football history
All-time record 684–455–44 (.567)
Postseason bowl record 7–4–0 (.636)
Claimed national titles 0
Conference titles 22
Division titles 7
Rivalries Cincinnati Bearcats (rivalry)
Ohio Bobcats (rivalry)
Heisman winners 0
Consensus All-Americans 0
Current uniform
NCAA-MAC-Miami Redhawks uniforms
Colors Red [1] and white[1]

             


Fight song Love and honor to Miami
Mascot Swoop the Redhawk
Marching band Miami University Marching Band
Website miamiredhawks.com
The Miami (OH) RedHawks football team represents Miami University located in Oxford, Ohio. Prior to the 1997 season, Miami was known as the Redskins.

The RedHawks are a member of the NCAA FBS Mid-American Conference and play their home games at Yager Stadium in Oxford. The RedHawks are currently coached by Chuck Martin. The football team's largest cohort are coaches Earl Blaik, Paul Brown, Woody Hayes, Bill Arnsparger, George Little, Weeb Ewbank, Sid Gillman, Ara Parseghian, Bo Schembechler, John Pont, Carmen Cozza, Bill Mallory, Jim Tressel, Joe Novak, Ron Zook, Dick Crum, Paul Dietzel, Bill Narduzzi, Randy Walker, John Harbaugh, Nobby Wirkowski, Gary Moeller, Larry Smith, Dick Tomey, Terry Hoeppner, and Sean McVay.

Name Position at Miami Later head coach at
Earl Blaik Assistant Coach/Player United States Military Academy
Jim Young Assistant Coach Purdue/U. S. Military Academy
Ara Parseghian Head Coach/Player University of Notre Dame
John Pont Head Coach/Player Indiana University
Carm Cozza Assistant Coach Yale University
Woody Hayes Head Coach Ohio State University
Bo Schembechler Head Coach/Player University of Michigan
Bill Mallory Head Coach Indiana University
Sean Payton Offensive Coordinator New Orleans Saints
Randy Walker Head Coach/Player Northwestern University
Jim Tressel Assistant Coach Youngstown State University/Ohio State University
Terry Hoeppner Head Coach Indiana University
John Harbaugh Player Baltimore Ravens
Kevin Wilson Assistant Coach Indiana University
Aaron Kromer Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line New Orleans Saints
Ron Zook Player University of Florida/University of Illinois
Sean McVay Wide Receiver Los Angeles Rams
Nobby Wirkowski Player York University OUA

Chester Pittser served as head football coach for the Redskins from 1924 through 1931 with a record of 41–25–2.[2] Pittser came to Miami from Montana School of Mines where he coached football and basketball.[2] While at Miami, he mentored future Pro Football Hall of Fame coaches, Paul Brown and Weeb Ewbank.[2] Frank Wilton came to Miami from his post as an assistant coach at Stanford and installed Pop Warner's double wingback offensive system.[3][4] In his first two years, 1932 and 1933, he led the Redskins to Buckeye Intercollegiate Athletic Association championships.[4] In those two years he only lost three games, two to Big Ten Conference teams Indiana and Illinois.[5][6] The next two years his teams won only five games each year,[7][8] but returned to championship form in 1936 with a 7–2 record and a share of the conference title.[9] The Redskins slid to a 4–4–1 record in 1937,[10] but rebounded in 1938 with a 6–3 record.[11] The last three years of Wilton's tenure saw a drastic downturn in victories. The 1939, 1940, and 1941 seasons produced a total of three wins.[12][13][14] After the 1941 season he was replaced by Stu Holcomb. Shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Wilton resigned his duties at Miami, effective at the end of the school year, to join the United States Navy.[15] He left Miami with the most football wins in school history, a record he retained until Randy Walker surpassed him in 1997. Wilton's 44 wins remain third in Miami football history.[16]

Sid GillmanEdit

Under head coach Sid Gillman, the Redskins compiled a record of 31–6–1.[17] Gillman is best known for helping develop the deep downfield pass that helped make football the game it is today.[18] Gillman's teams used that to great avail at Miami, as he led the Redskins to great success in his four seasons as head coach. Among Gillman's players at Miami was Paul Dietzel, who played center at Miami from 1946–1947 and would go on to win a national championship as head football coach at LSU. Gillman would go on to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach.[19] As an assistant, George Blackburn helped Sid Gillman lead the Miami Redskins to a victory over Texas Tech in the 1948 Sun Bowl.[20] Blackburn was named head coach for the 1948 season after Gillman left.[20] Blackburn stayed as Miami's head coach for one season guiding the team to 7–1–1 record and the 1948 Mid-American Conference championship.[20] In 1949, Gillman took the head coaching position at Cincinnati and Blackburn joined him as an assistant coach there.[20]

Woody HayesEdit

MU hired Woody Hayes away from Denison as head football coach after Blackburn's departure.[21] In his first season at Miami, Hayes led the Redskins to a 5–4 record.[22] In his second year with the Redskins, Hayes led the 1950 squad to a 9–1 record and an appearance in the Salad Bowl, where they defeated Arizona State.[23] Before the game, Hayes stated that the Sun Devils were afraid to play Miami, because Miami would beat them by two touchdowns. Hayes made good on the statement, with the Redskins winning, 34–21. Hayes had helped bring The Miami football program back to prominence after several years of mediocrity and absence from the spotlight. That success led him to accept the Ohio State head coaching position on February 18, 1951, where Hayes would cement himself as one of college football's greatest coaches.[24] Hayes' final record at Miami is 14–5.[25]

Ara ParseghianEdit

Ara Parseghian was chosen to take over as head coach of the Redskins after Hayes' departure.[26] Parseghian's teams at Miami consistently did well in the Mid-American Conference, posting a 7–3 record in 1951 and improving to 8–1 the following year.[27] The Redskins were conference champions in 1954 and in 1955, when they went undefeated.[28][29][30] Parseghian's success, which included two wins over larger Big Ten schools, raised his profile nationally as a head coaching prospect.[28][31] In late 1955, he departed Miami and was hired to become head football coach at Northwestern, one of the Big Ten schools Miami had beaten.[31] Parseghian compiled a 39–6–1 record in five seasons at Miami.[28] After his tenure at Northwestern, Parseghian would go on to cement a Hall of Fame career as head coach at Notre Dame, where his teams won the National Championship in 1966 and 1973. Parseghian's winning percentage at Miami (.859) is the highest of any full-time Miami head coach in the last 100 years.

Logos/Helmets/UniformsEdit

On July 24, 2013, the Redhawks held a launch event for new Adidas uniforms for the 2013 football season. Two Miami uniforms were released at the event and each design was paired with new chrome helmets. The white away uniform included red shoulders with the new "MIAMI" wordmark across the top.[32] The red design included white shoulders with the new "MIAMI" wordmark.[33]

Image galleryEdit

SeasonsEdit

2010sEdit

Season Coach Record
2019 Chuck Martin
2018 Chuck Martin 6-6
2017 Chuck Martin 5-7
2016 Chuck Martin 6-7
2015 Chuck Martin 3-9
2014 Chuck Martin 2-10
2013 Don Treadwell; Mike Bath 0-12
2012 Don Treadwell 4-8
2011 Don Treadwell 4-8
2010 Michael Haywood; Lance Guidry 10-4

2000sEdit

Season Coach Record
2009 Michael Haywood 1-11
2008 Shane Montgomery 2-10
2007 Shane Montgomery 6-7
2006 Shane Montgomery 2-10
2005 Shane Montgomery 7-4
2004 Terry Hoeppner 8-5
2003 Terry Hoeppner 13-1
2002 Terry Hoeppner 7-5
2001 Terry Hoeppner 7-5
2000 Terry Hoeppner 6-5

1990sEdit

Season Coach Record
1999 Terry Hoeppner 7-4
1998 Randy Walker 10-1
1997 Randy Walker 8-3
1996 Randy Walker 6-5
1995 Randy Walker
1994 Randy Walker
1993 Randy Walker
1992 Randy Walker
1991 Randy Walker
1990 Randy Walker

Notable AlumniEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Brand Colors (Miami (OH) RedHawks Official Team Colors. miamioh.edu. Retrieved on October 22, 2019.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Death elsewhere. Toledo Blade (October 19, 1978).
  3. Kurz, Bob (1983) "Miami of Ohio, the Cradle of Coaches" p. 52 Library of Congress Catalog Card number 83-50645
  4. 4.0 4.1 1980 Miami Athletics Hall of Fame Class. Archived from the original on March 8, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  5. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  6. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014.
  7. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  8. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  9. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  10. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  11. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  12. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  13. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  14. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  15. Kurz, Bob (1983) "Miami of Ohio, the Cradle of Coaches" p. 54 Library of Congress Catalog Card number 83-50645
  16. The Mid-American Conference: "The Cradle of Coaches". Retrieved on August 21, 2017.
  17. Sid Gillman. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  18. William N. Wallace. "Sid Gillman, 91, Innovator Of Passing Strategy in Football", The New York Times, January 4, 2003. Retrieved on August 21, 2017. 
  19. Hall of Fame coach Sid Gillman dies (January 4, 2003). Retrieved on August 21, 2017.
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 20.3 Former Virginia Head Football Coach George Blackburn Dies :: Blackburn coached the Cavaliers from 1965–70 and was named ACC Football Coach of the Year in 1968.. CBS (May 16, 2006). Retrieved on August 21, 2017.
  21. ABP3. Ohio State Coach Woody Hayes – history, famous quotes, all time record, photo gallery. Retrieved on August 21, 2017.
  22. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  23. Miami (OH) Season Schedule – databaseFootball.com/NCAA. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  24. When Woody was hired. The Ohio State University Alumni Association. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  25. Woody Hayes. Archived from the original on March 21, 2014. Retrieved on March 21, 2014.
  26. Ara Parseghian – Notre Dame Legendary Football Coach – Parseghian.org. Retrieved on August 21, 2017.
  27. Ara R. Parseghian Records by Year. College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on September 27, 2013. Retrieved on July 7, 2013.
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 William Barry Furlong (September 21, 1959). "'It's A Naturalness. It's Me'". Sports Illustrated: 128–140. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1133873/1/index.htm. Retrieved July 6, 2013. 
  29. 1954. College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on July 7, 2013. Retrieved on July 7, 2013.
  30. 1955. College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on July 7, 2013. Retrieved on July 7, 2013.
  31. 31.0 31.1 "Parseghian To Coach Northwestern", December 17, 1955, p. 25. 
  32. Photos of 2013 Miami Redhawks White Football Uniform. Retrieved on August 21, 2017.
  33. Photos of 2013 Miami Redhawks Red Football Uniform. Retrieved on August 21, 2017.

External LinksEdit

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