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Arkansas Razorbacks Football
Current season:
2020 Arkansas Razorbacks
1280px-Arkansas Razorbacks logo.svg.png NCAA-SEC-Arkansas Razorbacks Crimson helmet.png
First season 1894
Athletic director Hunter Yurachek
Head coach Sam Pittman
1st year, 0–0 (.000)
Home stadium Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium
Field Frank Broyles Field
Stadium capacity 76,212
Stadium surface Tahoma 31 (Fayetteville)[1]
FieldTurf (Little Rock)
Conference Southeastern Conference (SEC)
Division Western
Past conferences Independent (1894–1914)
Southwest Conference (1915–1991)
All-time history
Arkansas Razorbacks Historical Teams
1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899
1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929
1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949
1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
2020 2021 2022 2023 2024
All-time record 716–504–40 (.584)
Postseason bowl record 15–24–3 (.393)
Playoff appearances 0
Claimed national titles 1 (1964)
Conference titles 13
Division titles 4
Rivalries Ole Miss (rivalry)
LSU (rivalry)
Texas (rivalry)
Texas A&M (rivalry)
Missouri (rivalry)
Heisman winners 0
Consensus All-Americans 24
Current uniform
NCAA-SEC-Arkansas Razorbacks jerseys.png
Colors Cardinal[2] and White[2]

             


Fight song Arkansas Fight
Marching band Best in Sight and Sound
Website arkansasrazorbacks.com

The Arkansas Razorbacks football team represents the University of Arkansas located in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The Razorbacks are a member of the NCAA FBS Southeastern Conference and play their home games at the Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville. The Razorbacks are currently coached by Sam Pittman. As of 2019, the program has 1 claimed national championship awarded by the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) and Helms Athletic Foundation (HAF) in 1964, 1 unclaimed national championship awarded by the Foundation for the Analysis of Competitions and Tournaments (FACT) in 1977, 13 conference championships, 45 All-Americans, and an all-time record of 716–504–40.

History

Early history (1894–1957)

The first University of Arkansas football team was formed in 1894 and coached by John Futrall, who was a Latin professor at the University.[3] That team played three games: two against Fort Smith High School and one against Texas.[3] Before the 1909 season, the teams were called the Arkansas Cardinals and a bird was the school's mascot.[4] The name and mascot changed following the 1909 season when the football team, coached by Hugo Bezdek, finished 7–0.[5] The Cardinals became the Razorbacks after Arkansas defeated LSU 7-0 and coach Bezdek told them they were "as tough" as a band of fighting Razorbacks.[6][7] The Wooo Pig Sooie or calling the Hogs became a tradition and the official school cheer in the 1920s when farmers rushing out to meet the bus returning from an away game called the hogs as a greeting.[8][9][10] Arkansas prevailed over powerhouses Oklahoma, LSU and Washington of St. Louis in 1909, and was declared unofficial champions of the South and Southwest.[3] It was with the help of Steve Creekmore that this was accomplished. Creekmore became perhaps the first Razorback star, a quarterback from Van Buren, Arkansas who initially played only Intramural sports.[3] Bezdek used Creekmore to install a very early edition of the hurry-up offense, as the team never huddled and chased the ball after every play.[3] Creekmore was also known for "fast and slippery running, blocking, and passing" and could also return punts and tackle well.[3]

The Razorbacks joined the Southwest Conference (SWC) as charter members in 1915.[11] The conference also included teams from Texas (Baylor, Rice, Texas, Texas A&M) and Oklahoma (Oklahoma, Oklahoma A&M).[12] Southwestern (TX) would also join, but leave the following year.[13] The 1916, 1917, and 1919 teams were led at quarterback by "Arkansas' greatest athlete" Gene Davidson.[14] The Razorbacks didn't have a winning conference record until 1920, and didn't win the conference championship until 1936. Arkansas had the best record during the 1933 season, but had to forfeit the SWC Championship because Ulysses "Heine" Schleuter, who had no eligibility remaining, played on the team.[15] Schleuter had told coach Fred Thomsen that he was eligible, but he was recognized by an SMU player during the game as a former Cornhusker.[15] The Hogs did accept an invitation to the 1934 Dixie Classic, a precursor to today's Cotton Bowl Classic.[16] Arkansas became rivals with Ole Miss due to proximity. Although not SWC members, Ole Miss played Arkansas intermittently until a yearly series began from 19521961. During the 1938 season, the Razorbacks replaced their 300-seat stadium known as The Hill with Bailey Stadium, named after Arkansas governor Carl Bailey.[17] It was known as University Stadium for one game before being changed to honor the governor.[18] This stadium still exists today, although heavily renovated, as Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium, the current home of the Razorbacks.[18]


Frank Broyles era (1958–1976)

Missouri head coach Frank Broyles was hired as the Razorbacks head football coach in 1957 and served in that position for 19 years.[19] Arkansas would grow into a national power with Broyles at the helm, including several conference championships and a national title.[20] Arkansas would earn a share of the 1959 SWC Championship, splitting with Texas.[21] Arkansas lost only to #3 Texas and #6 Ole Miss during the season.[22] The Hogs went to Jacksonville, Florida and defeated Georgia Tech in the 1960 Gator Bowl 14–7, avenging an earlier Cotton Bowl Classic defeat.[23] Barry Switzer was a co-captain on the team.[24] Some, including University of Arkansas Chancellor and student during 1958, John White,[25] view the Razorback football team during this period as a revival of Arkansas, which was recovering from the Little Rock Nine and racial segregation problems.[25]

The 1960s was the best decade in Arkansas football history.[26] ESPN ranked Arkansas the 19th[27] most prestigious program in college football, but if only this decade was included, the Hogs would be 10th.[27] 1960 brought another SWC crown, and a Cotton Bowl Classic invitation for the Hogs, who were ranked as high as 7th during the season.[28] The Razorbacks lost to #2 Ole Miss and #20 Baylor, but defeated #11 Texas in Austin, bringing the championship to Fayetteville.[29] The Hogs lost to Duke, 7–6, because of a blocked extra point.[30] The following season brought another shared SWC championship with Texas.[31] The Hogs were defeated by the Longhorns 33–7,[32][33][34] as well as the #9 Ole Miss Rebels,[35] warranting an invitation to New Orleans for the Sugar Bowl.[36] #1 Alabama Crimson Tide defeated the Razorbacks 10–3.[37] The Crimson Tide had been declared National Champions before the game, which was the procedure at the time. The Hogs would fight this system in 1964, when the same Alabama team would claim the 1964 AP crown before losing the Orange Bowl to the Texas Longhorns, a team Arkansas defeated in Austin, Texas during the regular season.[38] Arkansas won the Cotton Bowl Classic over Nebraska, 10–7.[39]

Logos/Uniforms/Helmets

Image gallery

Seasons

2020s

Season Coach Record
2019 Sam Pittman

2010s

Season Coach Record
2019 Chad Morris, Barry Lunney 2-10
2018 Chad Morris 2-10
2017 Bret Bielema 4-8
2016 Bret Bielema 7-6
2015 Bret Bielema 8-5
2014 Bret Bielema 7-6
2013 Bret Bielema 3-9
2012 John L. Smith 4-8
2011 Bobby Petrino 11-2
2010 Bobby Petrino 10-3

2000s

Season Coach Record
2009 Bobby Petrino 8-5
2008 Bobby Petrino 5-7
2007 Houston Nutt; Reggie Herring 8-5
2006 Houston Nutt 10-4
2005 Houston Nutt 4-7
2004 Houston Nutt 5-6
2003 Houston Nutt
2002 Houston Nutt
2001 Houston Nutt
2000 Houston Nutt

1990s

Season Coach Record
1999 Houston Nutt

1980s

1970s

1960s

Season Coach Record
1969 Frank Broyles 9-2
1968
1967
1966
1965
1964
1963
1962
1961
1960

References

  1. Natural Grass returns to DWRRS (August 2, 2019).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Official Colors. Style Guides and Logos–University Relations. University of Arkansas.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Henry, Orville, and Jim Bailey. The Razorbacks: A Story of Arkansas Football. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1996.
  4. @BethanyOsborn, Bethany Osborn Staff Reporter. History of the Razorback: From Cardinals to Hogs. uatrav.com.
  5. 1909 Arkansas Razorbacks Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com.
  6. The history of the unique nicknames throughout college football. saturdaydownsouth.com (May 15, 2015).
  7. Traditions - University of Arkansas.
  8. Arkansas granted trademark for "Woo Pig Sooie!" Hog Call. collegefootballtalk (July 21, 2014).
  9. How the Hog Call Originated - Arkansas Alumni Association's Blog.
  10. The Story Behind the Real Razorbacks - Only In Arkansas. onlyinark.com (September 12, 2017).
  11. The dying days of the SWC. dallasnews.com.
  12. Error on call to template:cite web: Parameters url and title must be specified. newsok.com (August 20, 1995).
  13. Southwestern University bringing back football. statesman.com.
  14. Razorbacks (p). University of Arkansas Press.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Razorbacks (p). University of Arkansas Press.
  16. Press, The Associated. Arkansas Bowl History. Sand Diego Union Tribune.
  17. Today in History.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Razorbacks (p). University of Arkansas Press.
  19. Coach Frank Broyles. arkansasrazorbacks.com (August 14, 2017).
  20. "Frank Broyles, Football Coach Who Put Arkansas on Map, Dies at 92". 
  21. 1959 SWC champs having reunion. arkansasrazorbacks.com (November 7, 2014).
  22. 1959 Arkansas Razorbacks Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com.
  23. History: Gator Bowl. NCAA (December 11, 2013).
  24. A National Championship That Changed College Football - University of Arkansas.
  25. 25.0 25.1 Forde, Pat. "Legendary Arkansas icon's run nears finish line." May 31, 2007.ESPN. Retrieved on February 4, 2009.
  26. Bennett, Wes. Arkansas Razorbacks: Who Are the Best Razorbacks to Play in the NFL?.
  27. 27.0 27.1 Fallica, Chris, Loucks, Nick, and Shelton, Harold. "Prestige Rankings: Nos. 16–20." ESPN.com Retrieved on February 4, 2009.
  28. Final AP Top 20. 1960 AP Poll. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on February 4, 2009.
  29. Major Conference Champions. 1960 SWC Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on February 4, 2009.
  30. Bowl Games with Top 20 Teams. 1960 Bowl Results. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on February 4, 2009.
  31. Major Conference Champions. 1961 SWC Co-Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on February 4, 2009.
  32. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named espn.com
  33. "STABILITY IN THE UPSET CONFERENCE". Sports Illustrated.
  34. Daily Longhorn football history: The 1961 season - Hookem.com. hookem.com (July 9, 2017).
  35. "REBEL YELL FOR 1961". Sports Illustrated.
  36. 1962 Game Recap - Official Site of the Allstate Sugar Bowl.
  37. Bowl Games with Top 20 Teams. 1961 Bowl Results. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on February 4, 2009.
  38. Welcome Back: Bama's 1964 National Champs Return for a Reunion - Alabama Athletics.
  39. "Late Arkansas Score Beats Nebraska in Cotton Bowl, 10-7; Passes by Marshall Lead 80-Yard Drive Before 75,504". 

External Links

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