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Andrew Luck
File:Andrew Luck (2012).jpg
No. 12
Position:  Quarterback
Personal information
Born:  September 12 1989 (1989-09-12) (age 34)
 Washington D.C.
Listed height:  5 ft 11 in (1.8 m)
Listed weight:  215 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:  Stratford (TX)
College:  Stanford
NFL Draft:  2012 / Rnd: 1 / Pick: 1st
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • 4× Pro Bowl (2012–2014, 2018)
  • NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2018)
  • NFL passing touchdowns leader (2014)
  • Maxwell Award (2011)
  • Walter Camp Award (2011)
  • 2× Pac-12 Offensive Player of the Year (2010, 2011)
  • 2× First-team All-American (2010, 2011)
  • 2× First-team All-Pac-12 (2010, 2011)
Career stats

Player stats: PFR

Andrew Luck (born September 12, 1989) is a former American football quarterback. Luck played his entire 6 year career for the Indianapolis Colts of the NFL.

Career[]

Stanford[]

In 2011, Luck did manage to win the Maxwell Award and the Walter Camp Award as college football's player of the year. He was named a 2011 College FootballFirst Team All American.[1] He was the runner-up for the Heisman Trophy in both 2010 and 2011. He was named the Offensive Player of the Year in the Pac-12 (Pac-10) Conference in both 2010 and 2011. CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang called Luck the best prospect he has ever scouted,[2] while the Kansas City Star puts him in line with the NBA's LeBron James and Bryce Harper as "the most hyped amateurs in recent sports memory".[3] Although widely projected as the No. 1 selection in the 2011 NFL Draft, Luck decided to return to Stanford for his redshirted junior season.[4]

Indianapolis Colts[]

On April 26, 2012 Luck was selected by the Indianapolis Colts with the first overall pick in the 2012 NFL Draft.

Early life[]

Luck was born in Washington, D.C.,[5] the son of Oliver Luck, executive, former athletic director at West Virginia University and former NFL quarterback for the Houston Oilers, and Kathy Wilson Luck. Andrew Luck spent his early childhood in London, England and Frankfurt, Germany, where his father was general manager of two World League of American Football (WLAF) teams prior to becoming president of the league. He is the oldest of four children, Mary Ellen, Emily, and Addison, who currently reside in Houston. In London, he attended The American School in London.[6]

The Lucks returned to Texas when Oliver Luck was named CEO of the Harris County-Houston Sports Authority. In Houston, Andrew attended Stratford High School , where he threw for 7,139 yards and 53 touchdowns in his high school career, and rushed for another 2,085 yards.[7] Luck was also co-valedictorian of his graduating class in 2008.[8]

References[]

  1. Luck was also named First Team All America by the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), the Walter Camp Football Foundation, ESPN.com, and Pro Football Weekly.
  2. Luck stock rises even higher; Ingram's sags, by Rob Rang for CBSSports.com, November 29, 2010.
  3. Luck may need luck to live up to hype, by Sam Mellinger for The Kansas City (MO) Star, October 22, 2011.
  4. Andrew Luck skipping NFL draft, will return to Stanford Cardinal, by Ted Miller, for ESPN.com, January 6, 2011, accessed January 6, 2011.
  5. Andrew Luck. The Sporting News (November 3, 2009). Retrieved on November 23, 2009.
  6. [http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/08/19/SP3B19A8M2.DTL Cardinal offense gets a little Luck this year, Tom Fitzgerald, San Francisco Chronicle, August 19, 2009, first accessed November 23, 2009.]
  7. Player Bio: Andrew Luck, Stanford Cardinal Football 2009 Media Guide.
  8. Player Bio: Andrew Luck, Stanford Cardinal Football 2009 Media Guide.

External links[]

Baltimore / Indianapolis Colts starting quarterbacks
Fred Enke (1953–1954) • George Taliaferro (1953) • Ed Mioduszewski (1953) • Gary Kerkorian (1954) • Cotton Davidson (1954) • George Shaw (1955–1956, 1958) • Johnny Unitas (1956–1967, 1969–1972) • Gary • Cuozzo (1965–1966) • Tom Matte (1965) • Earl Morrall (1968–1971) • Marty Domres (1972–1974) • Bert Jones (1973–1981) • Bill Troup (1978) • Mike Kirkland (1978) • Greg Landry (1979–1980) • David Humm (1981) • Mike Pagel (1982–1985) • Mark Herrmann (1983–1984, 1992) • Art Schlichter (1984–1985) •Matt Kofler (1985) • Jack Trudeau (1986–1990, 1992–1993) • Gary Hogeboom (1986–1988) • Blair Kiel (1987) • Chris Chandler (1988–1989) • Tom Ramsey (1989) • Jeff George (1990–1993) • Jim Harbaugh (1994–1997) • Don Majkowski (1994)• Browning Nagle (1994) • Craig Erickson (1995) • Paul Justin (1995–1997) • Kelly Holcomb (1997) • Peyton Manning (1998–2010) •Kerry Collins (2011) • Curtis Painter (2011) • Dan Orlovsky (2011) • Andrew Luck (2012–2016, 2018) • Matt Hasselbeck (2015) • Josh Freeman (2015) • Scott Tolzien (2016–2017) • Jacoby Brissett (2017, 2019–present) • Brian Hoyer (2019)
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